Choose the best pushchair for you with our top recommendations and buying advice

Dads pushing babies in pushchairs

What are the different types of pushchair?

 

A simple buggy or stroller is very different from a travel system or an all-terrain pushchair, both in terms of price and features. If you’re unsure which one you need, we explain the differences in features between a standard buggy, an all-terrain (off-road) buggy and a travel system as well as their notable pros and cons.

Lightweight buggy or stroller

Pros

Lightweight and compact Easy to manoeuvre in shops and restaurants Generally cheaper than other pushchairs

Cons

Typically forward-facing only Not ideal for off-road Some only suitable from six months

 

Also known as strollers, these come in a variety of shapes and sizes, but the most popular are lightweight buggies, as they’re easy to carry and compact when folded. Some are suitable from birth, while others are only suitable for babies over six months old, as the back rest doesn’t recline far enough, or they don’t have enough padding.

Basic buggies are ideal for nipping around town, and they’re the go-to for many parents who regularly use public transport or live-in large towns or cities.

They’re also handy for holidays, as they’re much more convenient to carry around with you, and some even fold down small enough to be cabin luggage.

Previously it was rare to see a buggy that’s also travel-system compatible, but in recent years there’s been an explosion of strollers that you can use with an infant car seat and/or a carrycot.

These are more expensive than standard buggies, but they’re much more versatile. Traditionally buggies are forward-facing only, but many travel-system strollers have a reversible seat, so you can choose whether your baby faces you or looks out at the world. For more advice on this, read our guide to choosing the best stroller or buggy.

Travel system

Pros

Suitable from birth Can be forward or world-facing Ideal if you frequently use a car

Cons

Generally expensive Can be heavy and bulky Carrycot suitable only for 0-6 months and car seat from 0-9 months A large number of pushchairs and prams (as well as buggies and strollers) are travel-system compatible, giving you multiple options in terms of transporting your baby.

These pushchairs are suitable to use from birth, as you can use them with a Group 0/0+ car seat. For more information, read our guide to car seat weight groups.

Some also come with a carrycot or a seat unit that converts to a pram, so you can still use them from birth and swap to the seat unit once your baby is ready.  You’ll usually pay more for this functionality, but it’s worth investing in a travel-system pushchair if you use your car often, as it will make it much easier to transfer your baby from car to pushchair without disturbing them too much.

Bear in mind that long periods sleeping in infant car seats may be dangerous for young babies, as it can restrict airflow to the baby’s lungs and can put a strain on their developing spine.

It’s recommended not to keep a baby in a car seat – whether it’s in a car or attached to a pushchair – for longer than two hours at a time. This doesn’t apply if it’s a lie-flat car seat, though. For more advice on whether buying a travel system is a better choice for you than a pushchair, read our guide on how to choose the best travel system.

All-terrain or running pushchair

Pros

Can tackle rough ground Good all wheel suspension Useful for being outdoors and getting fit after having your baby

Cons

Not suited to public transport due to size

Can be very expensive

If you’re using a running buggy, you should only run with it from when your baby is six months

If you plan to venture off the beaten track with your baby, then you might want to opt for an all-terrain or off-road pushchair with large tyres and all-wheel suspension for tackling the rugged outdoors.

These can be four-wheelers or three-wheelers. Some three-wheel pushchairs are also running or jogging buggies.  Although all-terrain pushchairs are a practical choice for outdoorsy and active parents, they’re often longer, and can be too large to use on public transport or in crowded places such as supermarkets.

Because of their size you’ll need a big car boot to transport them, and enough space to store your off-road pushchair at home.

 

Buying a newborn pushchair or baby pram

Baby asleep in pushchair

Not all pushchairs are suitable for a newborn baby. Before you set your heart on a Bugaboo or an iCandy, check whether the seat is suitable from birth or can only be used by babies more than six months old.  Newborn babies can’t support their own weight when they’re so small, so they have different needs from older babies and toddlers. It’s important they lie flat in order to support their developing spine and allow them to breathe easily.  The best three options for a newborn are:

a from-birth seat: one that reclines to 150 degrees or more

pram format: some pushchair seats can convert to a pram by unclipping or unzipping the fabrics

a carrycot: it’s best for babies to sleep on a firm horizontal base, so if you’re expecting to use the pushchair for lengthy daytime naps, or whole afternoons in the park, choose one that can take a carrycot. Most pushchairs come with a carrycot option, which attaches either straight onto the seat or using adaptors. It’s best to wait until babies are around six months old, or when they start to sit up on their own, before you use a pushchair seat in its most upright position.

Buying an older baby or toddler pushchair

Toddler-in-stroller

Pushchairs with bucket seats have a fixed angle, so they’re only suitable for babies older than six months. This is usually around the age a baby can start sitting up on their own and supporting their own weight.  When you recline a pushchair with a bucket seat, the angle your baby is held in doesn’t change, and you’re effectively only tipping them back.

Some experts believe this isn’t the most comfortable way for your baby to sleep.  Travel systems with multiple seat-recline positions are suitable to use from birth with the seat in its lowest position (or if you use a carrycot). Older babies and toddlers can then use the seat in its most upright position.

Our tests check the ergonomic support given at each stage for every pushchair we review.  A stroller, or buggy, is a lightweight and basic version of a pushchair.

Some can only be used with older babies (more than six months) and toddlers, as they don’t recline far enough to be suitable from birth. But there are some models, such as the Babyzen YoYo2 and the Silver Cross Reflex, that can either recline far enough or you can use with an accessory pack to turn them into a from-birth pram.

Pushchair features to look out for

The second trimester can be the perfect time to start thinking about what you need to buy for your baby, including a pushchair or travel system.

Small niggles and frustrations will become very annoying when using your pushchair daily, so choosing the right one is essential. Before you splash out, read our pointers below to avoid a dud.

Reversible seat

Many parents like to have their new baby facing them to maintain eye contact, so a reversible seat is a good feature. This means you have the choice to keep them parent-facing while young, then world-facing when they’re older.

Adjustable handlebars

Being able to easily adjust the height of the handlebars will make it much more comfortable for you to push, especially if you’re a different height from your partner or anyone else using the pushchair. Separate handles, common on strollers, tend to flex quite a bit when pressure is applied, but we safety test them to ensure they comply with the British Standards for handle strength. A handle bar can be a more comfortable option, but a surprising number of bars are oval or square and can become uncomfortable to use after a long period of time.

Suspension

If you’re going to be heading to the park, across gravelly car parks or out for country walks, your baby will get a more comfortable ride with decent suspension. This can be on some of the wheels (called front or rear suspension) or on all four of the wheels (all-wheel suspension).

Shopping basket size

Capacity varies from 1kg to 15kg, but the average pushchair shopping basket can hold 4 or 5kg. Look for a basket with sturdy sides and good access, even when the seat is reclined. Additional storage pockets around the pushchair are also useful.

Pushchair-shopping-basket

Padding

Prams with extra padding, such as a head hugger, will help keep your baby supported and snug in their new pushchair. Check if the padding goes up the side of the seat as well as just on the base.

Swivel wheels

Swivel front wheels rotate to move in any direction with very little pushing and pulling and they make it easy to manoeuvre on normal ground, but they can make it harder to navigate across rougher ground or gravel. For the best of both worlds, choose a pushchair with swivel wheels that can lock, so you can turn this feature on and off depending on where you are going.

Uninterrupted stride

Probably not the first thing you’d think of when choosing a pram, but check you’re able to walk with the pushchair using your normal stride. Also make sure you don’t scrape your shin on a rear axle, brake bar, shopping basket or other accessories.

Backrest recline

The angle of the recline on the backrest of your pushchair is important because newborns can’t support their own weight and need to be in a lie-flat position. The best pushchairs for newborn babies are those with a recline of 150 degrees or more on the lowest setting. Some recline mechanisms are smoother than others and the best ones can be operated with one hand and are easy to use, even with the weight of a child in the seat. Recline options include a lever, buttons, a back bar and a strap or drawstrings. The latter two are usually the hardest to use.

Folding

An easy-to-use folding mechanism is essential. You’ll be folding the pushchair day in and day out, so try this out before you buy and avoid pushchairs where you need to remove accessories before it can be folded. Many pushchairs come with claims of having a one-handed fold, but our tests prove that reality can be very different.

Folding-pushchair

Brake pedals

The best have large pedals that are clearly labelled, easy to apply and effective. Watch out for brake pedals that stick out as these can catch on stairs and a bar connecting the brakes as that can obstruct your feet when walking. Look for flip-flop friendly brakes that you can press on and off to avoid scraped toes or shoes.

 

Size and shape

Bulky and heavy pushchairs can be hard to push, lift and generally manoeuvre. A good pushchair can be big without being difficult to use

. Leg rests and leg support

Smaller children who can’t reach the foot rest often end up with their lower legs hanging off the end of the pushchair seat in mid-air. An adjustable leg rest provides good calf support, and usually have between two and six positions to help keep your toddler’s legs comfortable.

Travel-system compatible

All the benefits of a pushchair, with the option of using a car seat on it. Travel systems, which you can use with a Group 0 or Group 0+ car seat, are a good choice for regular car users, as you can transfer your baby from pushchair to car without waking them up. Just bear in mind the current safety advice that babies shouldn’t be confined to their car seat for longer than two hours.

 

How much will a good pushchair cost?

 

Pushchairs vary enormously in cost. You can spend anything from less than £100 to more than £1,000, but in some cases, you’ll be buying a desirable name and fancy fabrics rather than a practical pushchair that’s easy to use and push.  In a  survey (March 2020) of 1,500 parents with children under the age of five, the average spend was £378. More parents (39%) spent between £101 to £450.

Some of the more expensive brands of pushchair include iCandy, Stokke, Bugaboo and Silver Cross.  We’ve found Best Buy buggies from as little as £150, so you don’t necessarily have to spend a large amount to get an excellent stroller.

Should I buy a second-hand pushchair?
Best pram and pushchair buying tips

There’s a sizeable market for second-hand pushchairs if parents want to save money. Very often they’re sold via local Facebook groups, on eBay, Gumtree or Shpock – our 2020 survey of 1,500 parents found 38% will sell their pushchair via an online marketplace when it’s no longer needed. Or, you may be able to buy one from a local mum’s group, friend or family member. There may even be one going for free on Freecycle.  If you go down this route, it’s better to buy it from somewhere that lets you inspect it before you hand over your cash. Look for ‘collection only’ sales. You should also check or look over the following:

Seat padding, hood and basket: check for any areas where the stitching might be coming loose, or for any tears or holes

Wheels: depending on the age of the pushchair, those wheels could have seen a fair amount of use, so take a look to ensure they’re not coming loose or appear rickety. If the pushchair has pneumatic tyres, are there signs of cracking of the rubber near the rims? And does the pushchair come with its own pump? It’s worth taking the pushchair for a quick circuit to make sure the wheels are aligned and it steers well

Chassis frame: run your eyes (and hands) over the frame of the pushchair to check for any cracks that could be a weak spot over time or any dents that might affect the smoothness of the fold

Folding and unfolding: is it easy to fold and unfold? Have a few tries to make sure you feel comfortable with the mechanism and ensure it doesn’t get caught at any point

Brake: make sure the brake still holds the pushchair securely, particularly on a slope

Additional accessories: the pushchair might come with a rain cover or bumper bar, so make sure that’s included. Ask the seller if they also bought any additional accessories that would go with the pushchair including a carrycot, footmuff or car seat adaptors

 

Is it safe to buy a second-hand pushchair?

The safety risks from buying a second-hand pushchair or pram are far less than those for a car seat. However, it’s worth checking if the model you have in mind has been subject to any product safety recalls. You can do this by visiting the Trading Standards website. You should also take a look at our Don’t Buy pushchairs to check if it’s included there. Many of our lowest-scoring pushchairs have failures with strength and durability, which could be a warning sign if you’re buying it second-hand.

 

What can I do with my old pushchair?

 

If you’ve got an unused pushchair (or two) lurking about, here’s some ways to free up storage space and maybe make some extra cash while you’re at it.

Sell your pushchair online: there’s a thriving second-hand market online for pushchairs – particularly when it comes to models in good condition from popular brands such as Bugaboo, Mamas & Papas, iCandy and Silver Cross. Don’t forget to factor in listing and selling fees.

Use NCT and second-hand baby product sales: alternatively, try a Nearly New sale organised by your local National Childbirth Trust (NCT) group. There you can sell unwanted baby products (minus a commission payable to the NCT, or set fee) as well as socialise with other parents. If there aren’t any in your area, check online for details of upcoming car boot sales. Give your old pushchair to friends and family: offering up an unwanted but functioning pushchair to extended friends and family remains a great way to reuse your buggy – and they’ll appreciate the helping hand from a trusted source.

Freecycle your buggy: if your pushchair is still in safe working order but you’ve had no luck selling it, you could give it away to others that need it through a community-based re-use scheme such as Freecycle or Freegle.

If all else fails: if your pushchair isn’t in good-enough condition to pass on to someone else, contact your local council for recycling or disposal options in your area. Because pushchairs are made up of multiple materials, you might need to take the pushchair apart to dispose of it in separate pieces.

Pushchairs Reviews

Nuna Mixx review

Test scoreShow Context

87%

Key features

  • Pushchair
  • Travel system
  • World and parent facing

Compare

verdict: An impressive Best Buy

We’ve made the Nuna Mixx a Best Buy because it’s a great all round stroller. All the key things you need from a pushchair are easy to do, the seat is comfortable and supportive, and it has a large storage basket. It’s been around for a while, but it’s still one of our highest scoring pushchairs.

Pros
  • Easy to fold and push
  • All functions are easy to use
  • Comfy seat
  • Large storage basket
Cons
  • Not all features can be operated one handed
  • Seat might get too narrow for older children
  • Quite heavy

Cybex Balios S Lux review

Test scoreShow Context

86%

Key features

  • Pushchair
  • Travel system
  • World and parent facing

Compare

verdict: Good ride and useful features

This pushchair is smooth to push on most surfaces, the hood covers your baby well, it has a spacious seat, a large storage basket and an easy-to-use brake. It’s easy to recline the seat and fold the pushchair. There are a couple of niggles – it’s a bit heavy and bulky – but this pushchair is definitely worth considering.

Pros
  • Easy to push on all surfaces
  • One-hand fold
  • One-hand recline
  • Suitable from birth
  • Reversible seat unit
  • Flip-flop friendly brake
  • Room to grow in seat
  • Good hood coverage
  • Easy-to-access basket
Cons
  • Quite heavy and bulky when folded
  • Memory buttons can increase risk of accidental seat detachment
  • Harness has long lengths of straps when tightened. 

    Nuna Mixx Next review

    Test scoreShow Context

    86%

    Key features

    • Pushchair
    • Travel System
    • World and parent facing

    Compare

     verdict: One of the best pushchairs we’ve tested

    The Mixx Next is one of the highest scoring pushchairs we’ve tested. It ticks plenty of boxes with its comfortable seat, good storage, and simple to use design. It impressed on our test course too, giving a smooth ride on most surfaces including pavement, sand and gravel.

    Pros
    • Well-padded seat
    • Good storage
    • Easy to manoeuvre
    • Good hood coverage
    • Simple to fold
    • One-hand recline
    • Comfortable handle
    Cons
    • Noisy hood adjustment
    • Stiff to unfold
    • Heavy and bulky

    Cybex Balios S Lux travel system review

    £580.00Typical price

    Test scoreShow Context

    86%

    Key features

    • Pushchair
    • Travel System
    • World and parent facing

    Compare

    Which? verdict: Good ride and useful features

    This pushchair is smooth to push on most surfaces, the hood covers your baby well, it has a spacious seat, a large storage basket and an easy-to-use brake. It’s easy to recline the seat and fold the pushchair. There are a couple of niggles – it’s a bit heavy and bulky – but this pushchair is definitely worth considering.

    Pros
    • Easy to push on all surfaces
    • One-hand fold
    • One-hand recline
    • Suitable from birth
    • Reversible seat unit
    • Flip-flop friendly brake
    • Room to grow in seat
    • Good hood coverage
    • Easy-to-access basket
    • Easy to attach car seat and carrycot.
    Cons
    • Quite heavy and bulky when folded
    • Memory buttons can increase risk of accidental carrycot or seat detachment
    • Harness has long lengths of straps when tightened.

    ABC Design Salsa 4 2018 review

    £409.00Typical price

    Test scoreShow Context

    86%

    Key features

    • Pushchair
    • Travel system
    • World and parent facing

    Compare

    Which? verdict: As easy to use as ABC

    The ABC Design Salsa 4 is a Best Buy because it’s easy to use and comes with a range of useful features, such as a large shopping basket and a carrycot included in the price. There’s also a large seat which can be used until your baby gets a lot bigger. It’s not that small when folded though, so this could be an issue if you have a small car boot.

    Pros
    • Easy to use
    • Works well
    • Looks smart
    • Compatible with a range of Best Buy baby car seats
    • Large storage
    • Carrycot included in the price
    Cons
    • No one-hand fold
    • Bucket seat
    • Harness height adjustment is tricky
    • Heavy and bulky and will take up a fair bit of space in the boot

    Nuna Mixx Next travel system review

    £650.00Typical price

    Test scoreShow Context

    86%

    Key features

    • Travel System
    • Travel System
    • World and parent facing

    Compare

    verdict: An excellent Best Buy pushchair

    Like its predecessor, the Mixx, the Mixx Next is a Best Buy. It gets brilliant scores across the board with its convenient design and excellent manoeuvrability making it one of our top picks.

    Pros
    • Well-padded seat
    • Good storage
    • Easy to manoeuvre
    • Good hood coverage
    • Simple to fold
    • One hand recline
    • Comfortable handle
    • Easy to attach and remove car seat and carrycot
    Cons
    • Noisy hood adjustment
    • Stiff to unfold
    • Heavy and bulky

    Graco Evo review

    Test scoreShow Context

    85%

    Key features

    • Pushchair
    • Travel system
    • World facing

    Compare

    verdict: A top-scoring travel system

    When we first tested the Graco Evo in 2016 it was a Best Buy, and the 2017 version is too. It also achieved a much higher score than its predecessor. Our experts unanimously agreed that this stroller is a pleasure to push and will provide a comfortable ride for your little one But what really makes it stand out from the crowd is how easy it is to change the seat direction or swap the seat unit for a carrycot or car seat. Not only is it very versatile, but it’s incredibly affordable, making it a great-value choice if you’re looking for a new travel-system pushchair.

    Pros
    • Good on all surfaces
    • Plenty of accessible storage
    • Very easy to fold and unfold
    • Great as a travel system
    • Practical
    • Comfortable to push
    • Easy to use
    • Suitable from birth
    Cons
    • Foam came off the bumper bar
    • Time-consuming set-up
    • Heavy and bulky when folded
    • Hood is a bit small
    • Fiddly harness adjustment

    Nuna Triv review

    Test scoreShow Context

    85%

    Key features

    • Stroller
    • Travel system
    • World and parent facing

    Compare

    verdict: Excellent compact travel system

    The Nuna Triv is a worthy Best Buy, a high-scoring travel system pushchair that offers a comfortable ride for baby and an easy push for parents. It’s impressive on a wide range of terrain, and it’s easy to steer and manoeuvre. Swapping the seat direction is quick and it’s simple to recline the seat. It’s quick to fold, and although it’s a little heavy when folded, the carry handle makes it easy to transport.

    Pros
    • Handles all surfaces well
    • Easy to manoeuvre
    • One-hand fold
    • Carry handle
    • Reversible seat
    • Spacious well-padded seat
    • One-hand recline
    • Large hood
    Cons
    • A little bulky and heavy when folded
    • Brake isn’t flip flop-friendly

    Maxi Cosi Nova 4 Wheels review

    £399.00Typical price

    Test scoreShow Context

    85%

    Key features

    • Pushchair
    • Travel system
    • World and parent facing
    Compare

    Which? verdict: Unique fold and excellent drive

    The Maxi Cosi Nova 4 Wheels is a Best Buy pushchair. It has a big soft seat that gives your little one room to move and grow, a practical hands-free folding system and it tackles all terrain with relative ease. It’s easy to swap the direction of the seat, or use a baby car seat or carrycot, giving parents lots of options.

    Pros
    • Well made
    • Practical features
    • Smooth drive
    • Comfortable seat
    • One-handed recline
    • Hands-free folding
    Cons
    • Heavy
    • Wide
    • Lots of parts to assemble
    • Small basket

    Mamas & Papas Armadillo review

    Test scoreShow Context

    84%

    Key features

    • Pushchair
    • Travel system
    • World facing

    Compare

     verdict: Great all-round Best Buy stroller

    The Mamas and Papas Armadillo is a great stroller that’s practical, easy to use every day and a good all-round pushchair. It’s had a range of small changes since we first tested it, and comes out of our latest testing with a high enough score to be awarded a Best Buy.

    Pros
    • Lightweight
    • Compact
    • Travel-system-compatible
    • Carry handle
    • Cup holder
    Cons
    • Overload the storage basket and it could drag on the floor
    • Non-adjustable handlebar

    Maxi Cosi Adorra review

    Test scoreShow Context

    83%

    Key features

    • Pushchair
    • Travel system
    • World and parent facing
    Compare

    verdict: Stylish Best Buy travel system

    The smart-looking Maxi Cosi Adorra is a Best Buy because it’s easy to use and provides a comfy ride for your baby. It’s also compatible with a Best Buy baby car seat to give your little one a great start to life. The large basket is always a winner with parents, but the instructions state just 2kg capacity. And folding can be fiddly – until you get the hang of it.

    Pros
    • Compatible with a Best Buy baby car seat
    • One hand recline and fold
    • Stands upright when folded
    Cons
    • Zip detached
    • Knack to the fold
    • 2kg shopping basket limit

    Recaro Citylife review

    Test scoreShow Context

    83%

    Key features

    • Pushchair
    • Travel system
    • World facing

    Compare

    verdict: A stylish Best Buy travel system

    The Recaro Citylife is a practical lightweight stroller that’s travel-system compatible. It has a decent-sized shopping basket, can tackle a wide range of surfaces with ease, and it will give your little one a comfy ride, which is why we’ve made it a Best Buy.

    Pros
    • Great to push
    • Lots of useful features
    • Hood provides decent coverage
    • Good size shopping basket
    • One-hand fold
    Cons
    • Seat unit is hard to remove
    • Carrycot needed to be able to use from birth

    Cybex Priam 2019 review

    Test scoreShow Context

    83%

    Key features

    • Pushchair
    • Travel system
    • World and parent facing

    Compare

    Which? verdict: Great ride and handling

    The improvements to the Cybex Priam mean that it’s now a high-scoring Best Buy pushchair. It’s easy to manoeuvre and feels smooth even over bumpy surfaces, the seat unit has room to grow and it’s nicely padded, the storage basket is expandable, and it’s easy to change the seat’s direction so your baby can face you or the world. It’s a practical pushchair for everyday use, and the fact that you can customise it so much will definitely win over some parents. But bear in mind that it’s bulky and heavy when folded, and you’ll need space to store it at home.

    Pros
    • Practical
    • One-handed fold
    • Reversible seat unit
    • Large hood
    • One-handed recline
    • Versatile
    • Easy to manoeuvre
    • All-wheel suspension
    • Spacious padded seat
    • Smooth to push
    • Secure storage
    Cons
    • Quite heavy and bulky when folded
    • Takes time to assemble
    • Memory buttons stay pushed in which is a safety hazard
    • Manual folding lock

    iCandy Peach Version 5 review

    £849.00Typical price

    Test scoreShow Context

    83%

    Key features

    • Convertible
    • Travel system
    • World and parent facing

    Compare

    verdict: Comfy for child and easy to push

    We expected big things from this latest version of the Peach and it’s delivered. The brand has improved on a number of aspects, including the shopping basket, the recline and the size of the seat. It’s a shame the seat unit needs to be removed before it can be folded, and it’s fiddly to convert the seat into carrycot mode, but other than that it’s a great pushchair.

    Pros
    • Excellent storage basket
    • Can be converted into a double pushchair while still remaining fairly compact
    • Well-padded large seat
    • Easy to push
    • Hood provides good coverage
    • Reversible seat
    • Travel-system compatible
    Cons
    • Fiddly to convert for carrycot
    • Bulky and heavy when folded

    Cybex Priam 2019 travel system review

    £1,199.00Typical price

    Test scoreShow Context

    83%

    Key features

    • Pushchair
    • Travel system
    • World and parent facing

    Compare

    verdict: Premium and versatile travel system

    The Cybex Priam is a Best Buy pushchair. There’s a lot to like about the Priam, aside from how it looks: it’s easy to manoeuvre and smooth to push over most surfaces, the seat unit is spacious and comfortable, the storage basket is expandable, and it’s easy to change the direction of the seat or swap it for a car seat or carrycot. It’s a practical pushchair for everyday use, and the fact you can customise it so much will definitely win over some parents. But bear in mind that it’s bulky and heavy when folded, and you’ll need space to store it at home.

    Pros
    • Practical
    • One-handed fold
    • Reversible seat unit
    • Large hood
    • One-handed recline
    • Versatile
    • Easy to manoeuvre
    • All-wheel suspension
    • Spacious padded seat
    • Smooth to push
    • Secure storage
    Cons
    • Quite heavy and bulky when folded
    • Takes time to assemble
    • Memory buttons stay pushed in which is a safety hazard
    • Manual foldi

    Cybex Eezy S review

    £185.00Typical price

    Test scoreShow Context

    83%

    Key features

    • Stroller
    • Travel system
    • World facing

    Compare

     verdict: Good ride and handling

    The Cybex Eezy S is a Best Buy stroller. Light, compact and easy to manoeuvre, it’s a practical choice for everyday use. It’s best for cities rather than long country walks, and it’s ideal for use on all types of transport. As the handlebar isn’t adjustable, we’d recommend trying this pushchair before you buy to make sure it’s a comfortable height for you.

    Pros
    • A good ride on all surfaces
    • Light
    • Compact
    • Easy one-handed fold
    • Easy to swap seat unit for a car seat
    • Decent-sized seat
    • Easy to adjust shoulder-strap height and strap length
    Cons
    • Jerky hood
    • Handlebar is not adjustable and quite low
    • Unstable if on a slope
    • No leg rest
    • Seat could be more padded

    Diono Quantum review

    £170.00Typical price

    Test scoreShow Context

    83%

    Key features

    • Pram and pushchair
    • Travel system
    • World and parent facing

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    verdict: A practical travel system

    The Quantum is a high-scoring pushchair; it should be a Best Buy because it’s good at what it does; it’s easy to use, and it comes with some useful features – such as the converting seat to carrycot. However, the instructions make one big mistake – they claim the seat unit can be used with a baby from three months old – which it can’t, because it’s a bucket seat and the angle of the backrest is not more than 150 degrees and the harness isn’t big enough to hold such a young baby securely. For this reason we can’t make it a Best Buy. However, we will be feeding back our findings to Diono.

    Pros
    • Practical and easy to use
    • Good manoeuvrability
    • Seat converts to a carrycot
    Cons
    • Bulky
    • Car seat adaptors can be put on the wrong way
    • Not a true one-hand fold

    Baby Jogger City Mini GT 2 review

    Test scoreShow Context

    82%

    Key features

    • Pushchair
    • Travel system
    • World facing

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    verdict: Fantastic all-terrain pushchair

    The Baby Jogger City Mini GT 2 is a classic in the Baby Jogger range. We first tested it back in 2012, where it was a Best Buy pushchair, and it’s kept hold of that title now. This version has the same elements that have made the City Mini such a popular pushchair – roomy seat, great manoeuvrability and a compact fold – but it’s also a great ride on a range of surfaces.

    Pros
    • Comfortable ride for baby
    • Room in seat to grow
    • Easy to fold
    • Suitable from birth
    • Compact fold and fits into car boot
    • Adjustable handlebar
    • Good hood coverage
    • One-hand fold
    Cons
    • Foot rest is fiddly to adjust
    • Access to storage basket is restricted due to metal bar
    • Handbrake is a bit stiff
    • On the heavy side

    Maxi Cosi Gia review

    Test scoreShow Context

    82%

    Key features

    • Stroller
    • Travel system
    • World facing

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    verdict: Good ride and useful features

    This is a great Best Buy pushchair. It handles well on most surfaces, is easy to fold, suitable from birth and comfortable for your child.

    Pros
    • Comfortable seat with room to grow
    • Nearly flat seat
    • Suitable from birth
    • Travel-system compatible
    • Good ride on most surfaces
    • Nippy to manoeuvre and steer
    • Spacious basket
    • Cup holder and rain cover included
    Cons
    • Handlebar doesn’t adjust
    • Hood is a bit flimsy and clicky
    • Fiddly harness height adjustment