Learn about the primary distinctions that exist between bio and non-bio washing powders by consulting the findings of our impartial laboratory research.

washing powder

Since we’ve been conducting research on washing powder for more than half a century, you could say that we’re rather knowledgeable about how to get your laundry clean.

In this article, we compare bio and non-bio washing powders, laundry liquids, and capsules by compiling the findings of our rigorous lab testing to analyse the differences between the two types of products.

We put more than 30 different laundry detergents to the test, including 14 that are not biological. The results of our testing show how well they remove food, make-up, and grease stains, as well as how well they preserve vividly coloured clothes and how well they keep whites spotless.

What sets bio washing powders apart from regular washing powders that aren’t bio?

The presence of enzymes is the primary characteristic that differentiates biological washing powder from non-biological washing powder. Enzymes are found in biological powders, solutions for laundering, and capsules, and they assist in the digestion of starch, fat, and protein. This assists in the removal of stains, such as chocolate or the grease from burgers.

In most cases, enzyme-based biodetergents perform better than their non-bio counterparts when it comes to removing stains.

According to the results of our research and testing, biological laundry detergents that contain enzymes are typically more successful at removing stains than non-biological powders and liquids are. However, the results of our testing on laundry detergent revealed that there are some good non-bio granules. The non-biological laundry detergent that received the best rating in our tests was the Lidl Formil Non-Bio Caps.

It does a decent job of getting rid of grease and drink stains, and it is an acceptable option if you would rather not use biodegradable products. The detergent contains a variety of chemicals, each of which is specifically formulated to eliminate a certain kind of stain.

The detergent contains enzymes in addition to surfactant (soap) and bleach, both of which are effective at removing a variety of stains. For instance, bleach can be used to remove tea stains, while certain surfactants are effective against greasy stains, such as those caused by frying oil.

What kinds of enzymes are found in different brands of washing powder?

Microorganisms such as bacteria and algae are the sources of enzymes, which are naturally occurring proteins extracted from these organisms. They function at low temperatures, which means that you may save energy by washing your clothes in cooler water thanks to the fact that they function at low temperatures. They are also totally degradable by natural processes.

The absence of enzymes in non-biological washing powders and detergents leads many individuals to believe that these products are better for their skin. On the other hand, there is scant evidence from scientific research to support the hypothesis that enzymes can irritate the skin. Since we’ve been conducting research on washing powder for more than half a century, you could say that we’re rather knowledgeable about how to get your laundry clean.

In this article, we compare bio and non-bio washing powders, laundry liquids, and capsules by compiling the findings of our rigorous lab testing to analyse the differences between the two types of products.

We put more than 30 different laundry detergents to the test, including 14 that are not biological. The results of our testing show how well they remove food, make-up, and grease stains, as well as how well they preserve vividly coloured clothes and how well they keep whites spotless.

What sets bio washing powders apart from regular washing powders that aren’t bio?

The presence of enzymes is the primary characteristic that differentiates biological washing powder from non-biological washing powder. Enzymes are found in biological powders, solutions for laundering, and capsules, and they assist in the digestion of starch, fat, and protein. This assists in the removal of stains, such as chocolate or the grease from burgers.

In most cases, enzyme-based biodetergents perform better than their non-bio counterparts when it comes to removing stains.

According to the results of our research and testing, biological laundry detergents that contain enzymes are typically more successful at removing stains than non-biological powders and liquids are. However, the results of our testing on laundry detergent revealed that there are some good non-bio granules. The non-biological laundry detergent that received the best rating in our tests was the Lidl Formil Non-Bio Caps.

It does a decent job of getting rid of grease and drink stains, and it is an acceptable option if you would rather not use biodegradable products. The detergent contains a variety of chemicals, each of which is specifically formulated to eliminate a certain kind of stain.

The detergent contains enzymes in addition to surfactant (soap) and bleach, both of which are effective at removing a variety of stains. For instance, bleach can be used to remove tea stains, while certain surfactants are effective against greasy stains, such as those caused by frying oil.

What kinds of enzymes are found in different brands of washing powder?

Microorganisms such as bacteria and algae are the sources of enzymes, which are naturally occurring proteins extracted from these organisms. They function at low temperatures, which means that you may save energy by washing your clothes in cooler water thanks to the fact that they function at low temperatures. They are also totally degradable by natural processes.

The absence of enzymes in non-biological washing powders and detergents leads many individuals to believe that these products are better for their skin. On the other hand, there is scant evidence from scientific research to support the hypothesis that enzymes can irritate the skin.

washing powder

According to the website NHS Choices, there is no evidence that the use of washing powders with enzymes (bio powders) or fabric conditioners can hurt the skin of your infant. However, exercise extreme caution if you are washing sensitive fabrics, such as silk or wool.

On the packaging of several different biological washing powders, such as Ariel, Daz, Persil, and Surf, it states that the washing powder should not be used for washing wool or silk.

A lot of different kinds of bio powders aren’t appropriate for washing silk or wool.

This is due to the fact that some enzymes can begin to degrade the protein found in wool fibres, hence causing the fabric to become ruined over time. Instead, you should make use of delicate or wool-safe detergents because these products have been formulated expressly for the care of these materials.

Washing powder that is non-biological in both the UK and other countries

Both non-biological and biological powders are sold in the same stores in the United Kingdom, making it one of just a few countries in the world to have this practise. In the majority of nations, non-biological washing powder, sometimes referred to as enzyme-free washing powder, is either difficult to come by or is exclusively sold for cleaning delicate materials like silk and wool.

However, because we are aware that some of our customers prefer to use non-biodegradable as well as biodegradable detergents, we put both kinds to the test to determine how effective they are at eliminating stains, preserving the colour of coloured garments, and preventing whites from becoming dingy.

We have discovered that biological detergents are typically superior to non-bios for the removal of stains in general; however, this does not imply that all biological detergents are excellent at removing stains.