Find out which are the best bread maker brands, and which have the fewest problems, based on our rigorous lab tests and survey of thousands of bread maker owners

Bread in bread maker

 

 

Paddle problems, inconsistent performance and broken fruit-and-nut dispensers are the most common bread maker problems, according to our survey of 1,650 owners.

Knowing which brands develop the most faults can be vital when choosing a new kitchen gadget. That’s why we asked thousands of  Connect panel members to tell us how pleased they are with their bread maker, whether they’d recommend it, and whether they’ve experienced any problems with it.

We’ve got data on the biggest bread maker brands including Kenwood, Morphy Richards and Panasonic – so you can see which ones you can reply on to bake a brilliant loaf, and which ones you should steer clear of.

Best vs worst bread maker brands

As the chart below reveals, there’s a clear difference between the brand with the highest customer score (89%) and the lowest (66%). There are also big gaps between average test scores, and the proportion of models our panel told us they experienced problems with.

 Best                       Worst

Customer score           89%                     66%

Average test score       81%                     72% %

faulty                               3%                       11%

Verdict: top bread maker brands in depth

We’ve pulled together our survey data and independent test results, along with insight from our bread maker expert, to give you the lowdown on each brand covered by our survey.

Read on to find out the pros and cons of each brand, and which ones are worth buying. The brands are ordered by their customer score, which reveals whether owners are satisfied with the brand and if they’d recommend it to others.

1. Panasonic bread maker verdict

With a customer score of 89%, Panasonic is the highest-scoring brand. Its owners are also the most loyal, with a solid 93% choosing the same brand again when buying a new bread maker.

The average test score is 81%, and nearly all Panasonic bread makers we’ve tested have been Best Buys.  Six of the eight models we’ve got online at the moment are Best Buys. None are Don’t Buys.

Panasonic bread makers start from around £120 for a basic model, rising to more than £200 for a top-of-the-range model. Overall, 3% of owners reported a fault with their machine.

This is the same overall percentage of faulty products as Argos Cookworks. Note: data is from a survey of 1,650 Which? Connect panel members who own bread makers (conducted in April 2021), and independent product testing.

2. Morphy Richards bread maker verdict

Morphy Richards came second for customer score, with 76%. 39% of owners remained loyal, but 61% swapped brand when they bought a new bread maker. The average test score is 73%, which puts Morphy Richards in line with Lakeland and Russell Hobbs.  We’ve previously seen Best Buy bread makers from Morphy Richards.

None are Best Buys currently, but none are Don’t Buys, either. Morphy Richards bread makers are affordable, with prices starting from around £50. Overall, 6% of owners reported a fault with their model.

Note: data is from a survey of 1,650 Which? Connect panel members who own bread makers (conducted in April 2021), and independent product testing.

3. Lakeland bread maker verdict

Lakeland has a decent customer score of 75%, which puts it above Russell Hobbs and Kenwood. 33% of owners remained loyal, but 67% swapped brand when buying a new bread maker.

The average test score is 72%, which puts it in line with the likes of Morphy Richards and Russell Hobbs. We only have one model tested at the time of writing, which isn’t a Best Buy.

The average cost for the models we’ve tested is around £70. Overall, 9% of owners reported a fault with their model, which is higher than all the other brands in our survey except Kenwood. Note: data is from a survey of 1,650 Which? Connect panel members who own bread makers (conducted in April 2021), and independent product testing.

4. Russell Hobbs bread maker verdict

Russell Hobbs has a respectable customer score of 72%. Just 12% of owners remained loyal when buying a new bread maker, meaning 88% swapped to a different brand.

The average test score is 72%, which puts it in line with the likes of Lakeland and Morphy Richards.  We have test results for just one Russell Hobbs bread maker at the moment. It’s not a Best Buy, but it’s not a Don’t Buy, either. Russell Hobbs bread makers are affordable, with prices starting from around £50.

Overall, 6% of owners reported a fault with their model. Note: data is from a survey of 1,650 Which? Connect panel members who own bread makers (conducted in April 2021), and independent product testing.

5. Kenwood bread maker verdict

Kenwood has a fairly respectable customer score of 71%. Just 26% of owners remained loyal when buying a new bread maker, meaning 74% swapped to a different brand. The average test score is 72%, which puts it in line with the likes of Lakeland and Morphy Richards.  Previous Kenwood bread makers we’ve tested have been Best Buys, but we don’t have any models currently tested. Overall, 11% of owners reported a fault with their model, which is the highest of all the brands this survey covers.

Note: data is from a survey of 1,650  Connect panel members who own bread makers (conducted in April 2021), and independent product testing.

6. Argos Cookworks bread maker verdict

With a customer score of 66%, the budget Argos own brand is the lowest-scoring brand. Just 19% of owners remained loyal to Argos Cookworks when buying a new bread maker, meaning 81% swapped to a different brand.

Previously we’ve see Best Buys from this brand, but also Don’t Buys. We haven’t tested any models recently. Argos Cookworks bread makers are affordable – you can pick one up for as little as £45.

Overall, 3% of owners reported a fault with their model. This puts the brand neck and neck with Panasonic for the fewest faulty products, but its overall customer score is much lower.

Note: data is from a survey of 1,650  Connect panel members who own bread makers (conducted in April 2021), and independent product testing. See our round-up of the best bread makers to narrow down the model that fits your budget and needs.

The three most common bread maker faults

There’s nothing shocking about the three most common bread maker problems reported on in our survey:

44% – problems with the bread-mixing paddle

17% – inconsistent performance

14% – broken fruit-and-nut dispenser.

Choosing a high-scoring model from a brand with a low fault rate should help you to avoid some of these problems.  However, paddle issues are easy to solve and don’t need to be a problem.

When we test bread makers, we check whether the paddle sticks, leaving a large hole in the bread. We also check the consistency of baking. We’re looking for bread that’s risen and baked evenly, and has a light and springy texture inside. For those that make the best, see our shortlist of the best bread makers.

You can usually buy spare mixing paddles, and if you’re getting inconsistent results it’s worth checking basic things such as whether your yeast is still in date, and that you’re following the recipe exactly. Even the temperature of your kitchen might have an effect on bread making.

A broken fruit-and-nut dispenser doesn’t spell the end for your bread maker. While it’s frustrating and shouldn’t happen, you can add extra ingredients manually instead. If you believe your bread maker is genuinely faulty, see our consumer rights faulty goods advice guides to see how you can take action.